Caldecott Medal

Year: 2015

The Adventures of Beekl: The Unimagerinary Friend

Author: Dan Santat Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2014

Locomotive

Author: Brian Floca Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Who is telling this story? Whose views are not being considered?

At the end of the book is a section called “A Note on the Locomotive.” It briefly mentions the plight of the American Indians whose hunting land and way of life were lost to the railroads. The Chinese

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

  • Honesty- The book states, “Here the bison used to roam, by the hundreds, by the millions, Here the Cheyenne lived, and Pawnee and Arapaho. … The railroad and the men who built it- they have changed it all.”
  • Empathy- This story is told with pride in how the locomotives and the railway system works. How would the Cheyenne, Pawnee and Arapaho have told this story? (And the Paiute and Shoshone?)
  • Advocacy- Read about the American Indians and the railroad using the internet with your teacher’s guidance. Decide who the railroads benefitted and who did not. Create a Pro/Con poster with the information you learned.
  • Action- Write to a group of American Indians to express your thoughts and feelings about how the railroad impacted them.
Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2013

This Is Not My Hat

Author: Jon Klassen Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2012

A Ball for Daisy

Author: Chris Raschka Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2011

A Sick Day for Amos McGee

Author: Philip C. Stead Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

  • Honesty- Amos McGee was sick for one day. It was no fun for him, but he only felt bad for a short time. Some people have to live with physical problems and lasting illnesses that limit their lives.
  • Empathy- Read the story of Fred Maahs who was injured in a diving accident that left him unable to walk. (http://blog.easterseals.com/how-the-ada-changed-my-life-someone-finally-...)
  • Advocacy- Are there students, staff, or teachers at your school with differing abilities/disabilities? Find special challenges they are facing and ask if they’d like you to help raise awareness.
  • Action- Read the “Get Involved” section of the Easter Seals for Disabilities website and find a way to get involved.
Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2010

The Lion and the Mouse

Author: Jerry Pinkney Publisher:

Guiding Question:

Have you ever considered someone to be so unimportant that you are better than them?

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

  • Honesty- The lion thinks he’s so strong and the mouse is so small that the mouse would never be able to help him.
  • Empathy- How do you feel when people think you’re too young or small, or not smart or skilled enough to help?
  • Advocacy- Find out more about people who are physically small- dwarves or little people at the Coalition for Dwarf Advocacy website or on the Roloff Family website (See the Resources section.).
  • Action- Raise awareness of the many accomplishments and challenges of little people. Decide if you would like to do fund-raising for one of the charities sponsored on the Roloff family website or another site.
Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2007

Henry's Freedom Box

Author: Ellen Levin Publisher: Scholastic Press

Guiding Question:

This story shows how slavery can impact a family, including children. Do you think being sold away from your family was the worst thing that slaves suffered? At the beginning of the story we read, "Henry's master had been good to Henry and his family." Can that be a true statement? Why or why not? Would you have tried to escape slavery as Henry did? Why or why not? 

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

Honesty- What does Henry's mother teach him about slavery children early on? Did you think this would happen to Henry in the story? Why or why not?

Empathy- Look carefully at the pictures of Henry throughout the story. They give clues to Henry's feelings. Describe how you think Henry feels at different parts of the story. Do the pictures match? Have you ever thougtht about all the things slaves lost? They once had lives in Africa with their own families, language, religion, songs, foods and more. They were violently taken from all of that. Once they started news lives in America, they were cruelly treated and had no rights. They often lost their new families, too. They couldn't marry without permission. 

Advocacy- Think about how your life would be different if you didn't know your family. Though not due to slavery, do you have classmates who don't live close to their families? Get to know them and ways you can help. If there isn't anyone in your class, are there people in your community that don't live close to their families. Find out if you can help. Another way to advocate is to find out how people whose ancestors are slaves can research their geneology. Click this link to find this type of information: Public Broadcast Company

Action- Host community events that can help people who aren't close to their families have people they can connect to. 

Sociology Concepts:

Year: 2004

Coming On Home Soon

Author: Jacqueline Woodson Publisher: C. Putnam's Sons

Guiding Question:

Have you ever longed for something to happen? How did you keep hope that it would happen when times became very hard? Do you think it was hard for Ada Ruth to keep hope when so much was happening in the world at that time? 

Howard’s Format from You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know (73-85)::

Honesty- At the beginning of the story, Ada Ruth's mother says to her, "Ada Ruth, they're hiring colored women in Chicago since all the men are off fighting in the war." Why does she say that colored women, not women are being hired? 

Empathy- Think about a time you really wanted something to happen, but you didn't know if it would or not. What were your feelings? Describe them.

Advocacy- Find out about how families in America were affected during World War II, especially the role of working women. Click on the link Partners in Production for more information. Describe Ada Ruth's and her grandmother's struggles. Do you think many people struggled in the U.S. during World War II?

Action-  Think of ways you can stay hopeful and positive when things are difficult. How can you support others when they're struggling in similar ways? 

 

Book reivewed by Sarah Mudd, Ohio Northern University teacher candidate.

Sociology Concepts: